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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll start off by saying I am new to this forum, and I'm not 100% sure this question belongs here. I did a small amount of perusing for topics on timing chains and didn't find a whole lot. Jeff McClurg (INTENSE tech guy) told me that they would take approximately 4 hours to install a single timing chain. My mechanic quoted it would take him 8 hours, YES EIGHT! That's double the time, and the amount of labor needed doesn't seem to just be knowledge of the car. I wanted to get ANY and ALL feedback on ways/shortcuts to install timing chains. My mechanic is willing to work with me on it, so if I can either get a link with detailed instructions or if anyone can give a good account of easier ways to do it, that would be great! I would surely like to save 4 hours of labor, and there's always something new to learn.
 

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ok first off, lower the sub frame about 3 inches, this will give you room to pull the harmonic ballancer off. Next remove the two bolts that hold the p/s pump ones at 12 ones at 5 or so. Next remove the lower rad hose. Then the coolant paths that sit where the alt is. the alt needs to be taken off too. Then there are the bolts that hold the t/c on. Theres like 8 or so all 13 mm Tak them off and its right there. If you are mechanicaly inclined it shouldnt take more than an hr to get the t/c off. Once its off swappin the chain is a sinch. Then just reverse process
 

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You do not need to lower the subframe to replace the timing chain. The harmonic dampner can be removed without lowering the subframe (on Wbodys at least).

Quick instructions to remove the timing cover are as follows (provided this is an L67/32), L36/26 are similar process minus one belt.

1) Disconnect the battery
2) Drain Coolant via front knock sensor
3) Drain Oil and remove oil filter
4) Remove belt(s)
5) Disconnect and remove the alternator
6) Remove the serpintine tensioner/alternator mount setup
*Note* Remove this carefully, or make sure to have new coolant elbows on hand
7) Remove the water pump pulley
8) Take the bolts holding the power steering pump out, and move the PS pump out of the way (you do not need to remove it)
9) Disconnect the lower coolant hose (the proper tool saves knuckles)
10) Remove the harmonic dampner (using the correct dampner removal tool)
11) Remove the plastic cover
12) Remove the three bolts from the oil pan that go into the timing cover
13) Unplug the oil pressure sender, crank position sensor, and cam position sensor
14) Remove the rest of the bolts holding the timing cover on
15) Remove the timing cover CAREFULLY F
16) Finagle the timing cover out the wheel well (dropping the subframe makes it easier, but not necessary)
17) Remove the timing Chain Tensioner
18) Hold the flex plate and remove the cam bolt
19) Remove and Replace the timing chain with new and replace the tensioner with new.
20) Reverse the process, torque everything to spec, and fill up the proper fluids.

That should give you a pretty good idea of what you will need to do... I did this off the top of my head, so I probably missed a few things.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Looking at the posts, I do have to add, what kind of labor time do you guys estimate? The first guy said about 1 hour to take it off, and 1 hour to replace, so his estimate is 2 hours for someone who knows what they are doing. What about anyone else? Got a good feel for the time it would take? It seems like it's not all that bad, and that there are two ways to do it. Which is the better/time-saver way? Dropping the sub-frame seems more commonly done, even though most manuals do not say to do that...
 

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If you know what your doing, and done it a few times before and have all the tools an hour total.

Average person with some experiance, about 2 hours total

Not knowing anything about 4 hours and thats taking your time and double checking everything.

And then 8 hours for the "god damnit" type job.

Do NOT drop the subframe, its not any way near worth the effort and the risks. If you drop it too far you can easily rack up another $500 bill replacing the SIR coil. Nor will it save you much time.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All right, cool. Thanks to those of you that had some input. I guess I'll either have to find a different mechanic (luckily I have TWO mechanics I trust, cuz you just NEVER know), or see if I can convince him that 8 hours is far-fetched for the job and that charging me 800 dollars of labor is a bit... much. I'm truthfully very mechanically inclined, and I love working on my own car, but I have 9 day weeks. I have class 4 days a week, and work 5 days, so each week I'm losing 2 days. To top it off, I AM indeed short a lot of the necessary tools and am still considerably a shade-tree mechanic. Oh well, sometimes ya just gotta fork over da money! Thanks again for the input, hope you all have fun with your cars and drive safe.
 

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GP_Pimp said:
If you know what your doing, and done it a few times before and have all the tools an hour total.

Average person with some experiance, about 2 hours total

Not knowing anything about 4 hours and thats taking your time and double checking everything.

And then 8 hours for the "god damnit" type job.

Do NOT drop the subframe, its not any way near worth the effort and the risks. If you drop it too far you can easily rack up another $500 bill replacing the SIR coil. Nor will it save you much time.

what the hell is the sir coil
 

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If you drop the subframe down too far without disconnecting the steering rack from it (and tying it up), you can pull the shaft out of the steering rack, and then for some reason people get in the car after bolting everything back up and try to turn the steering wheel and then the tires don't move so they "free wheel it" for whatever reason. This breaks the SIR coil. The SIR coil is a coil behind the steering wheel that makes a connection for the air bags.
 
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