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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have no idea where to put this thread so it's going here. I am probebly going to store my car for a few of the bad months this winter. I live in jersey so we can get some cold temps. and some bad snow occasionally. I was wondering if anyone has any advice as what preps to make before storing it. It will be outside unfortuantelly so I already have a cover. What I'm most concerned about is oil, fuel, and other fluids in the vehicle. Does anyone use any type of oil or fuel stabilizer? Anything else I should do?
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I'm in a very similar situation. I store my 98' GTP (just turned over 36,000 mi.) every winter for the same reasons. (I live in MI). I allways make it a point to start it up once or twice a month and let it idle to temp. If the roads are not wet or salty I try and get a few miles on it at least once a month. I make sure I go into the storage period with fresh oil (5-30 mobile 1 syn). And since the car is going to be sitting most of the time I make sure my engine coolant is clean (system flush if neccessary) and adaquate for the upcoming temps. Try not to let it sit with the tires in the same position all winter. And I try and keep betwwen a 1/4 and 3/8 of a tank of gas. Not a full tank, don't want the same tank of gas in the car for 3 mos. But, enough to keep condensation in the tank from forming.
 

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You pretty much are doing what I was planning. I always heard that a car should be started and ran till warm up at least twice a month. Do you use any type of fuel/oil stabilizer? What about the fuel additive that keeps the water in the gas from freezing? Is it necessary or is it crap?
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I have used the fuel line anti-freeze before and have had good luck with it . (Fuel line never froze) Last year I never used it once and had no problems. So, use your own judgement as to whether it's worth using. Only costs a couple of bucks for a bottle. As far as the oil goes I have never used any additive.
 

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I don't store mine in the winter exactly, but it doesn't get driven hardly at all. I found a remote starter is a nice feature to have for that. Mine sits outside under a cover, and about once a week to once per week and a half I'll remote start it until it gets warmed up to operating temp just to get everything moving (nice thing is you can leave the cover on, and don't have to leave the heat inside :cool: ). Plus, whenever it gets nice out (ie no snow on the ground) I take it around a bit to get everything (especially the tires) moving. I also reccomend an oil change just before, and I never put anything in my oil whatsoever. As for gas, I typically have between 1/2 and 3/4 tank in it, some of which slowly gets used up from remote starting it and driving it.
 

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k0bun said:
I have no idea where to put this thread so it's going here. I am probebly going to store my car for a few of the bad months this winter. I live in jersey so we can get some cold temps. and some bad snow occasionally. I was wondering if anyone has any advice as what preps to make before storing it. It will be outside unfortuantelly so I already have a cover. What I'm most concerned about is oil, fuel, and other fluids in the vehicle. Does anyone use any type of oil or fuel stabilizer? Anything else I should do?
Thanks
Hey there! This will be the 5th year i've stored my car, so i'll just throw out to you what i'd do if I had to store my car outside. Even though I store my car indoors, this is good stuff to do in and outside.

I ALWAYS use fuel stabilizer, and leave the car with a full tank of fuel (my own personal quirk). Just before I take the car home to be layed up, I try and make sure the tank's near empty, add the fuel stabalizer, fill'er up to ensure all of the fuel is treated, then drive home to ensure that the stabilized fuel is throughout the fuel system. Not to mention, with a FULL tank, it eliminates any condensation problems you may get with a slack tank. Gas line antifreeze wouldn't be a bad idea, but if you're going to be starting it on a regular basis, I wouldn't worry about it, unless you're fuel provider is known to give you a little water from time to time. :rolleyes: Personally, i've never used the gas line antifreeze, and have never had a problem. Dont worry about the fuel sitting in the tank for months so long as it's stabilized, and is worked in the system.

Ensure the coolant is the correct density to prevent from freezing, as the freezing would cause you a pretty big headache. :eek: Flush if you wish.

I always change the oil before the layup, and directly after the lay up (I let the new oil work in a bit before the storage). This prevents the dirty oil from sitting in the engine for months at a time, and could prevent the possibility of any sediment from solidifying to "gunk" in certain areas (ie. valve covers etc). I change the oil directly after the layup to rid the engine of any possible condensation buildup. This would relate to you where the car will be outside and you'll be starting it up from time to time in a colder climate, warming, then cooling rapidly.

I always prop my windshield wiper blades up off the glass, as it saves the rubbers. This may be going overboard, but a LITTLE bit of vasoline on any of your door/trunk seals wouldn't hurt, to prevent them from drying/cracking/sticking/tearing. They'll thank you in the spring, not to meniton, it wipes off easily.

If you were in a position to get away with it (ie. if you weren't going to move the car for months), i'd even remove the tires and wheels off the car. If you cant do that, then try and get some of the weight off the wheels. The harsh weather conditions take their toll on the rubbers more-so than if the car was being used. If you cant remove the rubbers, then move the car as much as you can to remove the chance for flat-spotting.

Try and use the brakes and emergency brake as much as possible when you're moving the car. The first two years I stored my car, it didn't move for about 5-7 months, and I had to turn my rotors both times due to warping. From then on, I made it a point to move the car and work the brakes in good (as best I could without leaving the driveway) and I never had the problem since.

Of course, starting the engine regularly is a gift to the gaskets and seals. :D

That's all I can think of for now. This may be a little overboard for some, but if you're into keeping the car for a long period of time, and will be storing it regulary (like I do) the car will thank you in the end.

Have fun, and no tears when the cover goes on!! :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
"No Tears"? You don't know what I'll be driving when I do store my car. A 91 Cavalier with no horn,radio, or headliner. And the thing rattles like a can of marbles when it hits 50mph. When it can. But hey I'd rather crash this car into a snowy guardrail than my baby ;) .

I do have a remote start so I'll be using that from time to time in the winter when I want to warm it up. I'll also be driving it around a little on some of the milder days.

Thanks for all the advice guys.
 
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